Could ‘Assassin’s Creed III’ be the end of Desmond?

10
Sep
2012
AssCreed

Desmond Miles, main character of the Assassin’s Creed series, has had his fair share of fans and critics since the first entry in 2007. Those who have played through any of the titles tend to either love or hate the sci-fi elements that this modern day assassin represents. According to Alex Hutchinson, creative lead for Assassin’s Creed III, Desmond’s number could be up sooner than we think.


Desmond Miles, main character of the Assassin’s Creed series, has had his fair share of fans and critics since the first entry in 2007. Those who have played through any of the titles tend to either love or hate the sci-fi elements that this modern day assassin represents.†According to Alex Hutchinson, creative lead for Assassin’s Creed III, Desmond’s number could be up sooner than we think.

One could argue that the Assassin’s Creed games doesn’t need to tie in to the present in order to make for a riveting story. Hutchinson may be leaning on that side as well after making the following statement.

ìI think Desmond needs to end. At some point. Things that go on too long lack resonance. Weíre asking people to remember seven yearsí worth of story. Which is like saying you were injunior†highand now youíre finishing college. And you need to remember what you were doing in junior high.î

He goes on to make a comparison of this predicament to Rod Serling introducing each episode of The Twilight Zone. Despite each story being different, Serling was always that one constant much like Desmond.

So far, very little of Desmond has been shown or even mentioned in the upcoming Assassin’s Creed III. The Vita release of the series, Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation, is confirmed to not even have the modern day protagonist at all which only further implicates that the book is closing fast on Desmond’s story. Was this the plan all along? Hutchinson further explains on this.

ìThe big beats were always sort of known. I think one of the challenges of popularity for the franchise has been a request for more continuity. There was a bit of a scramble, I think, during AC: Brotherhood and into AC: Revelations for the franchise itself to get to the point that we can plan better for future games. I think weíre in a good spot now and that we have what we hope is a good plan for moving forward. We had an ending in mind for Desmond [from the start] that weíre going to stay pretty true to.î

I’m personally fine with the Desmond parts in Assassin’s Creed. Maybe it’s the performance by Nolan North or maybe I’m just a sucker for any halfway decent science fiction story. The series certainly doesn’t require it and would do well, maybe even better, if each game was a standalone and separate tale much like Final Fantasy. Let us know if you would miss Desmond in the comments section.

At the risk of sounding like an infomercial, “But wait, there’s more!”

Producer Francois Pelland has shined some light on the potential direction that Assassin’s Creed could go in the future. Considering we started during the time of the Crusades in Jerusalem, then the Renaissance in Italy, and now the American Revolution in New England, one would think the next entry will chronologically follow suit. Pelland explains that this isn’t necessarily a rule that the team is following.

ìItís a question weíve been getting a lot. Itís not a moving forward thing, itís all based on lineage and on DNA and therefore it has nothing to do with time. The next game could easily go backwards as much as forward, no problem.î

Of course, this opens up speculation on where or when the series will take us next. Hutchinson has expressed interest in going to India during the British Raj period. Personally, I would love to see a trip to feudal Japan with the Templars†masqueraded as shogun and our assassin taken after the ninja mercenaries of that time. Comment below†on which setting you think Assassin’s Creed should take up next.



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